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Case Studies
Three case studies are used to guide the reader through the six steps outlined in the Six-Step Relational Database Design™ book, each increasing in complexity. Each case study begins with a real world scenario and takes the user through the E-R and R-M diagrams, ending with executable SQL commands to implement the derived designs.

 

Case Study 1

This is the first of three case studies that are used to guide the reader through the six steps outlined in Six-Step Relational Database Design™. The most important outputs of the six step database design process are outlined here, but the details of each of the steps and intermediary outputs are described in the book.

Scenario for Case Study 1

A small accounting firm wants a simple HR application that will help it to keep track of its employees, their positions, allowances, salary scales, and which company vehicles their employees drive.

The application must keep track of all the positions at the firm, the employees filling these positions, the allowances for these positions, the salary scales for these positions, and the company vehicles assigned to these positions.

Case Study 2

This is the second of three case studies that are used to guide the reader through the six steps outlined in the Six-Step Relational Database Design™ book. The most important outputs of the six step database design process are outlined here, but the details of each of the steps and intermediary outputs are described in the book.

Scenario for Case Study 2

The owners of a small computer repair shop would like to keep track of the repair jobs for computers they repair, the items used for each repair job, the labor costs for each repair job, the repairmen performing each repair job, and the total cost of each repair job.

When customers bring their computers in to be repaired, they make a deposit on the repair job and are given a date to return and uplift their computer. Repairmen then perform repairs on the customers’ computers based on the repair job, and detail the labor costs and the items used for each repair job.

When customers return they pay the total cost of the repair job less the deposit, collect a receipt for their payment, and uplift the repaired computer using this payment receipt.

Case Study 3

This is the third of three case studies that are used to guide the reader through the six steps outlined in the Six-Step Relational Database Design™ book. The most important outputs of the six step database design process are outlined here, but the details of each of the steps and intermediary outputs are described in the book.

Scenario for Case Study 3

The registrar at a small college wants an application that will help their department keep track of the schedule of classes, the courses and lecturers appearing in the schedule, and the students registering for courses according to the schedule.

Courses are scheduled every semester and this is documented in the schedule of classes, which also documents the lecturers assigned to each schedule of a class. Students register for courses according to the schedule of classes.

Users (students, lecturers, and other college staff) must login to the application to gain access, and the application must keep track of user logins/logouts. In addition, users must have different levels of access, which will determine their access to different parts of the application.